Art Adventures

Posts from the ‘Journey Back to Passion’ category

My backpack trip into the Enchantment Mountains proved worthy of the incredible challenge I faced just to arrive. It was extremely rugged country. Mountain goats, waterfalls, lakes, icebergs, glaciers, and sheer cliffs astounded us with views at every turn.

I am no stranger to backpacking. I backpacked as a kid in the Colorado Rockies with my family. Later, I explored the Pacific Northwest with my husband and our kiddos, once they were old enough to hike (or be carried, as the case often was…ha…). Camping out in the wilderness rejuvenates my soul. I usually feel as though I have been holding my breath and when I get into the mountains, I finally exhale, and breathe deep for the first time in a long while. Ahhhhh……there it is. I’m whole again.

When my husband suggested we hike into the Stuart Range in Washington for a family trip, however, I was a little reserved. What? No, no, not for the kids, but for me! Our boys, ages ranging from 14-20 at the time, were completely able to carry their own food, clothes, and selves deep into the great outdoors. No problem. In fact, strong, young boys with tons of muscle and energy? Hiking was a breeze for them. All I had to do was organize the food and get myself and my own backpack to the destination. Easy enough, right?

Problem. Errrr, yes. Twelve miles in and 7,000 feet elevation gain of steep, rugged wilderness awaited. I was nervous about the sheer amount of physical energy needed to arrive at the campsite. Nevertheless, excited to go, I envisioned the beauty and couldn’t wait to begin. We made plans, reserved our permit, packed, organized, and headed up. Oh, and I DID pack my watercolor journal. Extra weight, sure, but I could handle it.

HA.

Every ounce practically killed me by the end. In fact? Just the weight of my own body proved almost too difficult to bear.

Difficult. But worth every step. It was so beautiful, so challenging, so scary, and so amazing, and I’ll probably never see it again.

Here we are, in all our pre-hike glory.

Here we are, in all our pre-hike glory.

The hike started out extremely steep, rising up out of the valley just outside of Leavenworth, Washington.

Me, with my three boys and friends, on our way up to Snow Lake

Me, with our three boys and friends, on our way up to Snow Lake. Hubby took the pic. It was a little steamy, as you can tell by the boy’s hair.

Our goal for the first night was to hike in and camp at Snow Lake, a 6 mile trek.The hike in was gorgeous, steep, but not terribly difficult.

Snow Lake. View from our camp, first night.

Snow Lake. View from our camp, first night. Mt. McClellen in the background.

No worries, I thought! I can handle this! The next day we headed out for the upper lakes.

By the second mile on day two, my knee was giving me a bit of grief from the steep climb the day before. THIS day, the climb was even steeper, working our way up boulder fields,

Boulder fields

Boulder fields above Snow and Nada Lakes.

over tumbling waterfalls,

Hubby and I, posing for an "excuse pic" i.e. RESTING!

Hubby and I, posing for a pic (i.e. RESTING).

 

across a dam, with floating trees on one side and a waterfall on the other (we had to cross the 12″ concrete dam while water rushed over the top…yikes!!),

This was scary for me. Death by drowning on one side, death by OUCH on the other! CONCENTRATE, Sarah! The dam was slippery!

This was scary for me. Death by drowning on one side, death by OUCH on the other! CONCENTRATE, Sarah! The dam was slippery!

and over a rounded, dead-drop boulder with rebar as footholds so that hikers would (hopefully) not plunge to their death. I have no photo of that, sketchy enough that my legs quivered and I was SO NOT taking my camera out. In fact, I may have cried. That’s just a rumor, mind you.

It was hot, gorgeous, and tiring.

Some of us rested in the shade. Kid 3 tired out from helping me up the boulders.

Some of us rested in the shade. Kid 3 tired out from helping me up the boulders.

So, yeah, gorgeous, but (ouch)knee, fear of heights, and water/drowning issues came to the front of my anxiety on that day. I worked it all through, though. and was rewarded with the most amazing high-alpine location I’d ever been.

Once we arrived at Vivian Lake, we re-grouped with a water filter re-fill, lunch, and a much-needed rest.

Son 1, refilling his water with a water filter system.

Son 1, refilling his water with a water filter system.

We rested among the no-fear mountain goats and spent the next day exploring the area before heading down the following day.

We hiked the entire 12 miles out in one day. By the time I reached the truck, I could barely place one foot in front of another. My legs were jellyfish, seemingly only marginally attached to my body with painful connections called joints. My back, shoulders and neck were stiff and my feet? Ugh. Too much. Only the memories of my family in one of the most gorgeous places I’ve been, and the photos I took, kept me going through some painful muscle aches for the rest of the week. Oh, and quite a substantial amount of Advil (and possibly wine…another rumor).

This past weekend, paying homage to this amazing hike, I worked on a landscape of one of the waterfalls we found at the lakes. I wanted to capture the raw beauty of this location, the way nature molds the landscape, the resistance and strength of the alpine trees, and the simple glory of water in erosive action. I’m bringing this to you, in the hopes that you can experience a part of The Enchantments, without the pain of the hike!

Enchanted, 12x32, original watercolor on textured Plexiglas

Enchanted, 12×32, original watercolor on textured Plexiglas

“Enchanted” was created for a group show at Tumalo Art Company, and is hanging at the gallery during the month of March. It’s delightful to see in person, with collaged texture and watercolor crayons capturing the rugged feel of the cliff bands surrounding Vivian Lake.

Enjoy the new work, and find it and other paintings of mine at Tumalo Art Company, and Hood Avenue Art.

Follow me on FacebookTwitter, and Instagram and follow this blog to be informed of amazing new paintings and events! Contact me to receive my newsletter so that we can meet at showings and to receive notifications about classes. I will be planning a workshop painting class in the fall of 2017. I will post more when I know the dates. Every one of my paintings is available as a print, and I sell signed greeting cards of all my images

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Ahhh…February. A sign that spring is around the bend. I don’t know about you, but I feel a sense of hope. Winter might (might…) be ebbing. February is hope and romance. Valentine’s day. What images and smells come to mind when you think of February? Chocolate? Roses? Can you smell it? Close your eyes and imagine.

For Valentine’s day this year, I painted a special piece, a work that expresses hope, joy, and love. Something we need to remember. When asked about what Valentine’s Day means to me, a word came to mind.

Embrace

Definition, dictionary.com: 1) take or clasp in the arms; press to the bosom; hug; 2) to take or receive gladly or eagerly; accept willingly, to embrace an idea; 3) to avail oneself of: to embrace an opportunity. 4) to adopt (a profession, a religion, etc.): to embrace Buddhism; 5) to encircle; surround; enclose.
Such a wonderful word. And, especially, I believe, at a time right now when there is much anger and discontentment among many in our nation. Embrace. Remember to embrace each other. Do not focus so much on division, but inclusion.
To illustrate that feeling, this painting invites you in and envelops you in a luscious bouquet of flowers, of overflowing blossoms, engulfing your senses with petals; a deeply floral, earthy scent. Bury yourself in the blooms and feel the embrace of the bouquet. Carry that sense with you today and share it with those around you.
Embrace, 20x16, original watercolor painting on Plexiglas

Embrace, 20×16, original watercolor painting on Plexiglas

 

This painting will be in our new group show at Tumalo Art Company. The show is entitled “The Joy of Everyday Things”,  and is tied in with Bend’s Joy Project #bendjoyproject.

Enjoy the new work, and find it and other paintings of mine at Tumalo Art Company, Hood Avenue Art, and other venues. The Source and other new work is currently installed at North Soles Footwear in downtown Bend, OR.

Follow me on FacebookTwitter, and Instagram and follow this blog to be informed of amazing new paintings and events! Contact me to receive my newsletter so that we can meet at showings and to receive notifications about classes. I am planning an upcoming workshop on Textured Watercolors in February, 2017. Let me know if you would be interested in the 2-day class. Every one of my paintings is available as a print, and I sell signed greeting cards of all my images.

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What does the word game Bananagrams share with an artistic journey? Bananagrams can be like art (or life?) in that sometimes you have to re-scramble what you have and create something new. The goal in the word game is to use every letter tile in your possession and assemble them into interconnecting words. At times, in order to use every last tile, you need to take apart the words you’ve connected and assemble them differently. Other times, you may need to discard a tile back into the drawing pile in the hopes of drawing a better letter. I’ve played plenty of Bananagrams lately, both with my boys over the holiday season, and with art.

How do you play Bananagrams with art, you ask? Experimenting, then selectively choosing what works and what doesn’t. Discarding techniques that don’t feel right, and re-evaluating/re-assembling those that do. Let’s say you’ve been painting in a realistic style for a while, when it becomes apparent you need to change things up. Realistic styles may be better suited to some artists, but maybe you are needing a different message. Impressionistic work, with vibrant colors might fit. So you try it out and experience an exhilarating “aha!” moment. This, THIS is what you’ve been waiting for!

My artwork has gone through major changes. For many years, my transparent watercolor paintings were traditional, realistic portraits on 140# cold-pressed paper. Every eyelash, hair, wrinkle, and detail was depicted on a muted, deeply washed background.

Why would I change the above style? It works, doesn’t it? It did, but as time and circumstances change, so does a person’s art, or reason for creating art.

Creating art is a continuing journey, and artists find themselves through experimentation of styles, media, themes, and technique, ideally narrowing these down to a bounty of work that speaks the artist’s message clearly and cohesively. It is a natural, tried and true method of becoming a successful artist.

In 2013, because of changing circumstances in my life, I no longer chose to paint in a realistic manner. Although I still painted with watercolors, I changed my surface on which I painted, along with my style, my theme, and my palette. An abrupt change like this is not for the faint-hearted. Sure, it’s invigorating and challenging, but can be frustrating, scary, and takes time.

During the resulting three-year experimentation, I tried several styles.

Wishes, 20x16, $750

Impressionistic style with vibrant hues

I enjoyed painting almost all of them, and liked them initially, but eventually noticed they didn’t fit what I was trying to say. The painting above, for instance, is bright and impressionistic, but felt jarring and didn’t convey the serene beauty of the connection between the girls. I knew I needed to try something different. After many months and many more paintings, I stumbled upon semi-abstract landscapes. I taught myself the technique.

Soon after, I realized my recent paintings had been about inner strength and power. True grit, introspection, steeling yourself for battle, having tenacity, and calming the soul with those inner powers. These themes reoccur frequently in my life and I feel they resonate with many people. I decided to focus on that idea as a central theme in my new work.

In 2017, I’m challenging myself to build a solid, cohesive body of work, necessary to becoming a successful artist. In that vein, I’m working hard to develop artwork that collectors can easily identify, central around the theme of inner strength. To do so, I’m focusing on the following 6 criteria, on the advice of renowned gallery owner and writer, Jason Horejs:

  1. Subject Matter: Landscapes
  2. Style: Semi-Abstract
  3. Theme: Strength, Serenity, and Inner Power
  4. Palette: Neutrals with areas of saturated hue
  5. Medium: Watercolor and Gouache on Plexiglas
  6. Presentation: Float frames, wax coating

Since September, 2016, you have seen the new direction in my work. The choice I’ve made to paint landscapes in a semi-abstract manner feeds a theme of inner strength and calm more appropriately than does a literal, realistic painting. Strangely enough, it’s much more difficult for me to paint in a semi-abstract manner than it is to paint realistically. There are so many decisions to make on how to fill the space. The process is challenging, intuitive, and engaging.

Here is an example of my new direction, and, coincidentally, my first painting of 2017:

The Source, 16x32, watercolor and mixed media on Plexiglas

The Source, 16×32, original watercolor and mixed media on Plexiglas

What is SO COOL about this painting is that the mountains are created around a long strand of netting, which flows down into the foreground, creating a gully or river. There is a feeling of power, strength, and fortitude through use of color and composition. “The Source” implies both the source of water, and an inner source of strength.

Choices, detail

The Source, detail

Paper squares, string, and tissue are layered into the gesso base to give the painting an amazing texture. Plus, look at those COLORS! Yum. Neutral with a pop of saturated blues and oranges. This is what I love about my “new” style. It has more imagination, more power, freedom, and suggestion. I feel like I can sit and look at the work for days, seeing something new every time.

Playing Bananagrams with my artwork, i.e., completely changing my style in 2014, then tossing out what didn’t work, keeping what did, and embracing semi-abstract neutral landscapes, has proven to be a challenging, meaningful change. Follow me this year and see where I go!!

Enjoy the new work, and check it out at Tumalo Art Company, Hood Avenue Art, and other venues. The Source and other new work is currently installed at North Soles Footwear in downtown Bend, OR.

Follow me on FacebookTwitter, and Instagram and follow this blog to be informed of amazing new paintings and events! Contact me to receive my newsletter so that we can meet at showings and to receive notifications about classes. I am planning an upcoming workshop on Textured Watercolors in February, 2017. Let me know if you would be interested in the 2-day class. Every one of my paintings is available as a print, and I sell signed greeting cards of all my images.

 

 

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Dreams can be powerful motivators.

Aside from daily tasks, jobs, school, and duties, dreams create motivation to reach for more. Something for yourself. Something that feels real, alive, and is worth feeding with time and energy.

I have dreamed of being an artist since I was a small child on our farm in Colorado. While I’ve painted and sketched my whole life, I’ve not had the chance to devote myself completely to that dream. But because it has ALWAYS been with me, I’ve pursued the dream in my off-times: when the kids were napping, or when they were at school; on weekends, in the evenings. I’ve kept that dream alive. It’s given me a direction and a purpose in life that is just for me, and outside of all other responsibilities. I’m motivated to succeed as an artist, and therefore driven to achieve that ideal. Because of that motivation and dream, I have become a more focused artist, with a network artistic connections, and a more efficient business plan.

Have you had a dream? I persistent thought that won’t leave you alone? Something that keeps you going through the muck and the mire that life throws at you? Has it been a motivator for you?

This painting, entitled “Dreams”, is a metaphorical imaginary landscape, illustrating our far-reaching hopes and desires, and the power those dreams have in our lives.

 

Dreams, 30x22, watercolor and mixed media on Plexiglas

Dreams, 30×22, watercolor and mixed media on Plexiglas

 

In Dreams, a large, expansive sky opens to aspirations above a lower area suggesting land, water, and trees; a grounding base to the dream. In the gessoed surface, there are circles and gestured scribbles, describing strength.  As dreams are sometimes convoluted and have many paths, textured squares and wrinkled tissue add routes to explore, and areas for contemplation. Dramatic darks intertwine with deliberate tree shapes, signifying action and power. The color palette is subdued, lending itself to introspection: building strength for the goal.

I love the ethereal, yet powerful gestures of Dreams. It needs to be experienced in person to catch the nuance of texture and pattern in the surface.

To see this painting, stop by Hood Avenue Art during their November show, where I am featured artist. Most of my work is in the entryway of this beautiful gallery in downtown Sisters, Oregon.

Follow me on FacebookTwitter, and Instagram and follow this blog to be informed of amazing new paintings and events! Contact me to receive my newsletter so that we can meet at showings and to receive notifications about SB Hansen Watercolor & Wine Painting Classes. I am planning an upcoming workshop on Textured Watercolors in January. Let me know if you would be interested in the 2-day class. Every one of my paintings is available as a print, and I sell signed greeting cards of all my images.

 

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Artists see life differently.

I recently traveled to Colorado to visit my folks and take a mini-vacation. I grew up in Colorado and LOVE, LOVE, Love it.. I still consider it my home. We drove several times into the mountains to see fall colors. I think I took around 500 reference photos…just of trees, mountains, and landscape. Crazy, huh?

On one drive, we drove from Montrose towards Telluride to see broad views of the San Juan Mountain Range, along with several (or what seemed like thousands) of people pulling off the road and taking pictures of magnificent peaks. As we pulled out of a forest access road, facing the opposite (read: boring) direction from the mountains, I stopped our Subaru and hopped out, taking photos of a ridge across the road. My parents didn’t see anything amazing in the general direction of my camera focus. But I popped back inside, all excited, proclaiming, “THAT will become a painting!”.

Here is the “inspiring” ridge photo that so sparked my interest:

Ridge of trees in Colorado

Ridge of trees in Colorado

Now, MOST people look at that picture and think, “meh…”. Am I right? Do you see the potential? When I showed the picture to my husband, he could not believe I would be inspired by such a bland scene.

I, on the other hand, could not wait to get into the studio and begin the process of translating it into beauty I saw in my eyes and imagination. This, I think, is the magic of being an artist; the ability to translate and re-interpret daily scenes from life. We can explain it through a title or inject it with colors; perhaps with a feeling of emptiness in space around the focal point, or nostalgia with color choices, maybe impact with composition and value. In fact, I could take this picture and pull completely different emotions from my viewers with several different paintings.

Seeing a lone tree, a bottle, a slice of fruit, or a mundane landscape can provide an artist with an opportunity to speak about issues we all face in our lives and our world. Artists see life differently and give us a chance to join in that view.

That ridgeline? NOT boring. Instead, beautiful and metaphorical. Here is how I interpreted that very mundane ridge in Colorado:

The Ridge, original watercolor and mixed media on Plexiglas, 30x22

The Ridge, original watercolor and mixed media on Plexiglas, 30×22

Texture, ridgeline placement, empty space, color, and a sense of being on the edge introduce a thought of past and future with this painting. I am at a turning point in my life right now. I’m in the space between raising my children (one left…a senior in high school) and choosing my next step. Metaphorically, I’m looking at the ridgeline as a point of view, a destination to see the goal. Once I get up there, I can view past and future paths from the same point. I must work towards that ridge, though, and getting there might be rough, as you can see the landscape is tangled with roots, sand, and textural challenges.

Like I said…Artists see life differently. Would you be inspired by the photo of the junipers on the cliff? What type of connection would you have drawn between that photo and your life? Have you taken photos that you find meaning in, not necessarily just in the subject matter?

To see this painting, go to Hood Avenue Art in Sisters, Oregon later this week, where I will be featured artist during the rest of October and most of November. Make sure to come by the gallery and see me and visit about the new landscape work. I’ll be there Fourth Friday, this Friday, October 28th from 4-8pm.

Follow me on FacebookTwitter, and Instagram and follow this blog to be informed of amazing new paintings and events! Contact me to receive my newsletter so that we can meet at showings and to receive notifications about SB Hansen Watercolor & Wine Painting Classes. I am planning an upcoming workshop on Textured Watercolors in January. Let me know if you would be interested in the 2-day class. Every one of my paintings is available as a print, and I sell signed greeting cards of all my images.

Cheers, people! And Feed the Beast!

 

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As part of my recent relationship series, the new painting, “Fishing Bug”, takes a closer look at the bond between fathers and kids.

Raised on a farm in Colorado, my sister and I were not afraid to get outside and get dirty. We were outside ALL the time, it seemed. Our dad was a big part of this picture, as he has always loved working on the fields or hiking the hills. He taught us how to appreciate nature through camping, backpacking, hiking, and picnics. Every weekend during the summer, I would ask, “Can we go camping this weekend, Dad?” or, perhaps more accurately, “Daddy, can we PLLLEEEAAASSSEE go camping?”, usually while sitting on his lap, looking as sweet as I possibly could. I would pull out all the stops to get him to say yes, it was my favorite family activity. Dad always tried to make it happen, if possible. We spent days lounging at the campsite, cooking s’mores, and going for critter walks. Once in a while, we would get lucky and spot a weasel, pika, muskrat, beaver, bighorn sheep, deer, elk, or even a bear. Dad loved to sit and admire wild animals in their environment, and would involve us in his quiet observations. He gifted us with the love of nature.

I have been fortunate to have the most wonderful fathers in my life: My dad, my husband, and my father-in-law. All are kind, strong, and loving, with a bonus of living life to the fullest and passing those gifts on to their children. In the joyful “Fishing Bug”, I work to express those ideas on canvas.

Fishing Bug, 12x20 original watercolor and collage on Plexiglas

Fishing Bug, 12×20 original watercolor and collage on Plexiglas

It’s the moment of excitement when everyone in the boat realizes that, “Fish on!”, a fish has caught the lure and the fisherman is reeling to bring him in. Half-turned to us, a girl in her red hat stands up, her own fishing pole ignored and off to the side, as she giggles and shouts in happy jubilation that her sibling is wrestling in a wild beast. Dad calmly teaches the youngest child exactly what to do and how to do it. A bent rod next to a net gives us an anticipation of dinner by the young hunter. Both kids are hooked. They have caught the fishing bug.

Notice string threading throughout the painting. This string signifies unity and connection between the father and his kids, and a passing on of tradition, as well as the movement of fishing line through water and air. Grids of texture reproduce net patterns, symbolizing the capture of both kid’s attention and their new love of the sport. The boat is old, not in the best shape, but no one cares. It’s all about fun and experience and time together; not material wealth or possessions. Small squares of red color from the girl’s shorts transfer her energy of the moment into the air. Her red hat tells us she lives life to the fullest, just like her dad. A dark treeline in the background give us a sense of the place, and an area to highlight the energy around her hair and further enhance this exciting moment. Sharing white of a sundrenched shirt and hat, the father and young child illustrate closeness while both of their hands are on the rod and their focus is on the goal of nabbing a fish. A number 9 smudged on the boat side tells us how many fish the crew will catch that day.

“Fishing Bug” symbolizes tradition, fun, excitement, and a sharing of family values that fathers pass on to their children. Did you have special traditions your father passed on to you? Does this painting remind you of those traditions? Message me your thoughts below. I’d love to hear about them.

If you are in Central Oregon in August, make sure to go check out “Fishing Bug” at Tumalo Art Company, as this painting should be seen up close and personal.

Follow me on FacebookTwitter, and Instagram and follow this blog to be informed of amazing new paintings and deals! Contact me to receive my newsletter so that you see me at showings and receive notifications about SB Hansen Watercolor & Wine Painting Classes. Every one of my paintings is available as a print, and I sell signed greeting cards of all my images.

 

 

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Last week, I looked at relationships between sisters with my blog post and painting, “Wishes”. This week, I take a closer look at another relationship, mothers and daughters.

I don’t have a daughter, but I am a daughter. My mother is still alive, in all her glorious 84 years! She went to Italy with me this spring, during our Paint Tuscany trip.

Mom and I in Tuscany

Mom and I in Tuscany

My mom and I and my sister formed an interesting triangle growing up. I was caught mediating battles between two of them. Although unpleasant at the time, it taught me valuable skills of negotiation, compromise, and an ability to see both sides of every argument. After my sister left for college, Mom and I grew closer and enjoyed many activities and conversations together. Our relationship bloomed further after I married and started a family. Even though we lived 1,300 miles apart, we talked every week and saw each other as often as we could. Through the past 30 years, my mom and I continue to grow our relationship as she experiences the downfalls of true age and shares with me what it was like for her to go through her 40’s and 50’s and the challenges that each age brings. She has always been there for advice with parenting, marriage, and friendship. She gives me incredible encouragement and drive to go after my dreams of being an artist. She went to college and obtained a degree in her 50’s and has written and published 2 books. One of which she just published last year at age 84!

During my childhood, there were many times when I believed she “didn’t love me”, didn’t understand my troubles, or just didn’t care. What I couldn’t grasp at the time, was how much she really did care, and sometimes that care resulted in actions just the opposite of what I wanted to happen!

In painting “Going Home”, I wanted to capture a moment in a day when, after several attempts to rally her daughter, Mom finally grabs the daughter’s hand and says, “Yes, it is really time to go. Now.” It’s the end of a fun day and the daughter is tired and sad to leave. She feels her mom just doesn’t understand, or care about her feelings. The mother is tired as well, and both trudge off for dinner and possibly a bath before bedtime. Mom imposed her rule and her authority and daughter is feeling the brunt of it. But the mother has only the well being of her daughter in mind.

Going Home, 14x11 Original Watercolor and Collage on Plexiglas

“Going Home”, 14×11 Original Watercolor and Collage on Plexiglas

In this painting, I bring up a conversation about the relationship between mother and daughter. They are joined at their hands and in their communing shadows on the ground. Although you can feel the disappointment in the daughter, there is acceptance in her posturing, and a love and connection both will feel their entire lives. The colors are joyful, promising a bright future.

 

“Going Home” is available at Tumalo Art Company in Bend, Oregon. When you go to see it, notice the explosions of square colors radiating off the girl’s skirt. Her emotions cannot be contained. The shadows mingle and their hands are connected to illustrate the lifelong connection between the two. Trees are in the background, softly suggesting a promising future. Notice that the girl has rubber boots on. This brings up a conversation that morning about shoe wear. The mother probably didn’t want her daughter to wear the boots, but gave up on the argument, acknowledging her daughter’s ability to choose her clothes and giving her that choice., further illustrating the balance of authority, choices, friendship and love in their relationship.

Follow me on FacebookTwitter, and Instagram and follow this blog to be informed of amazing new paintings and deals! Contact me to receive my newsletter so that you see me at showings and receive notifications about SB Hansen Watercolor & Wine Painting Classes. Every one of my paintings is available as a print, and I sell signed greeting cards of all my images.

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